Senior Manager – Policy Advocacy

Posted By: CHILD RIGHTS AND YOU

Not Specified

Not Specified

Not Specified

Children/Youth and Volunteering

Job Description

Your Challenge: CRY - Child Rights and You is India’s premier child rights NGO. We work to ensure lasting change in children's lives by ensuring child rights through community empowerment. We do this by working with grassroots-level NGOs, communities and their children, influencing government policies, raising funds, and efficiently disbursing them, creating awareness and mobilizing people’s opinions on child rights. Your role: The position sits in the Policy Advocacy unit within CRY – Child Rights and You. This role requires a dedicated professional equipped to carry out policy analysis, develop critique of legislations and schemes and programs pertaining to children. Role also demands tracking of policy developments in the arena of child rights, inputting in development of position papers and policy briefs and writing academic articles. Position also requires to work closely with other team members in carrying out advocacy with the centre and state government in order to bring abou

Desired Candidate Profile

Post Graduation - Post Graduate-Other

The candidate must be a postgraduate in social sciences – MSW, Development Studies. The candidate must have minimum of 8 years experience. The candidate should be technically quipped in areas of Policy Analysis, Research. It is desired to have excellent written and oral communication skills. Understanding and experience working on child rights issues would be an added advantage

Organization Details

  • Organization Name:CHILD RIGHTS AND YOU
  • About Organization:CRY is an umbrella NGO providing financial, logistical, and management inputs to over 200 grassroots organizations working in the area of child rights. For close to 36 years now, CRY has been the voice of the marginalized Indian child, speaking up for their rights, to the government, corporate, individuals and the media. Today, CRY has made a difference to the lives of more than 2 million Indian children